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Why do negative comments and conversations stick with us so much longer than positive ones?

A critique from a boss, a disagreement with a colleague, an...

Positive talk in the teaching profession

October 23, 2017

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Positive talk in the teaching profession

October 23, 2017

Why do negative comments and conversations stick with us so much longer than positive ones?

 

A critique from a boss, a disagreement with a colleague, an argument with a student, a misunderstanding with a parent – the sting from any of these can make you forget a month’s worth of praise or accord. If you’ve been called lazy, careless, or a disappointment, you’re likely to remember and internalize it. It’s somehow easier to forget, or discount, all the times people have said you’re talented or conscientious or that you make them proud.  Chemistry plays a big role in this phenomenon. When we face criticism, rejection or fear, when we feel marginalized or minimized, our bodies produce higher levels of cortisol, a hormone that shuts down the thinking center of our brains and activates conflict aversion and protection behaviors.

 

We become more reactive and sensitive. We often perceive even greater judgment and negativity than actually exists. And these effects can last for 26 hours or more, imprinting the interaction on our memories and magnifying the impact it has on our future behavior. Cortisol functions like a sustained-release tablet – the more we ruminate about our fear, the longer the impact.

 

Positive comments and conversations produce a chemical reaction too. They spur the production of oxytocin, a feel-good hormone that elevates our ability to communicate, collaborate and trust others by activating networks in our prefrontal cortex. But oxytocin metabolizes more quickly than cortisol, so its effects are less dramatic and long-lasting.  This “chemistry of conversations” is why it’s so critical for all of us -especially teachers – to be more mindful about our interactions. Behaviors that    increase cortisol levels reduce a person’s ability to connect and think innovatively, empathetically, creatively and strategically with others.

 

 

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